Psychodynamic Therapy in London | Private Therapy Clinic

What is Psychodynamic Psychotherapy?

Psychodynamic Psychotherapy rests on the understanding that conflicts, stress and tension that are experienced subconsciously, or at least partly subconsciously, can result in problems at a conscious level that can hold people back from success across a range of areas. It also assumes that if you can become more self-aware and understand how the past continues to impact on you today, you will be better able to manage your own feelings and behaviour because you will understand the origins of the conflicts you experience, and will, therefore, be in a better position to change how you respond to them.

The conflicts explored often relate to experiences, or dysfunctional relationships in early childhood—perhaps very early childhood—that you might not have even thought about on a conscious level for years, or that possibly you do not even retain a conscious memory of at all. You may have built defences to deal with a difficult situation then; your situation has changed but the defences remain and, instead of protecting you, they are causing real problems in your everyday life. Perhaps you are unwittingly trying to recreate relationships that were problematic for you as a child or attempting to deal with a source of stress using an approach that is no longer appropriate. Now, as then, these relationships are not making you happy, but you seem unable to break out of a rut. By figuring out what is going on in the depths of your mind, and resolving the areas that are problematic, you can address the issues that are causing stress and make the changes that are necessary to achieve happiness and positive growth in your life as you go forward.

What are the techniques used in Psychodynamic therapy?

Techniques that Psychodynamic Therapists use, together with their clients, to achieve their goals include free association, the interpretation of dreams, exploring painful memories, and developing a positive relationship between Therapist and patient. In fact, this form of psychotherapy rests on the premise that positive growth cannot take place at all in the absence of a positive relationship of this sort.

In conversation with your Therapist, exploring your deepest thoughts and fears can be stressful and hard, but in the process, people often find that they form a close therapeutic relationship, and can make real progress relatively quickly.In this respect, this therapeutic modality differs from the more traditional approach to psychotherapy, which takes a long-term approach.

Psychodynamic psychotherapy can be offered to individuals, groups, and families, and is particularly helpful in areas including personality disorders and with problems such as post-traumatic stress syndrome. Unlike traditional psychoanalysis, which involves a considerable investment of time and emotional energy, sessions are paced at a rate of one a week or so, so that you can make progress with your therapy in a way that is not incompatible with work and family commitments.

How do I get Psychodynamic Psychotherapy in London?

If you would like to talk to someone about Psychodynamic Psychotherapy, please get in touch with us at the Private Therapy Clinic by telephone at: 02081507563 or by email to: info@privatetherapyclinic.com.

References

Leichsenring, F. (2003, 12). The Effectiveness of Psychodynamic Therapy and Cognitive Behavior Therapy in the Treatment of Personality Disorders: A Meta-Analysis. American Journal of Psychiatry, 160(7), 1223-1232

McKay D (2011). “Methods and mechanisms in the efficacy of psychodynamic psychotherapy”. The American Psychologist. 66 (2): 147–8, discussion 152–4.

Shedler J (2010). “The efficacy of psychodynamic psychotherapy”. The American Psychologist. 65 (2): 98–109.

THERAPISTS WHO OFFER Psychodynamic Therapy AT PRIVATE THERAPY CLINIC

  • 21 Aug 2019

    The 5 Things Most People Don’t Understand About Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD)

    Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is often mistaken by those who observe the condition in another as rudeness and even narcissism. And while it’s true that there is some cross over between both narcissistic individuals and those with BPD, the two are entirely separate conditions with their own.....

  • 19 Aug 2019

    7 Clear-Cut Signs Your Relationships Are Rooted in Co-Dependency

    Co-dependency is an emotional and behavioural condition that is often learned and passed down from one generation to the next. It's a dynamic that can take root in any form of relationship, from the romantic to companionships and friendships as well as being observed in caregiving situations......

  • 14 Aug 2019

    The 6 Defining Character Traits of Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) is a mental condition that is characterised by an obsession with one or more perceived flaws of one's physical appearance. It has recently been classified within the DSM-5 obsessive-compulsive and related disorders category. However, while it does share many common tra.....

  • 11 Aug 2019

    How to Recognise If You Have Relationship OCD

    Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a relatively common mental health issue in the UK, with around 1.2% of the population experiencing some form of it. People often tend to characterise the condition in finite terms, with the classic example of ritualistic behaviours used as the quintessential ca.....

  • 05 Aug 2019

    How do I Know When I Need to See A Psychiatrist?

    Medical dramas on TV often like to portray Psychiatrists as the first port of call if you're feeling down, or experiencing emotional difficulties. And although there is much good that can come from seeing a Psychiatrist, it isn't always the best avenue to explore. There are many types of mental heal.....

ALL ARTICLES