Compassion Focused Therapy | The Private Therapy Clinic

What is Compassion Focused Therapy?

Compassion Focused Therapy brings together elements of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and insights from a range of fields, including neuroscience, Buddhist psychology and evolutionary psychology to help patients to train their minds in compassion. In the process, they acquire the ability to feel compassion towards themselves, and to self-soothe when times are difficult.

Why Does Compassion Matter?

When we see the world, and ourselves, through a lens of compassion we can become enabled to change difficult behavioural patterns relating to negative thoughts and feelings into more positive ones. Negative thoughts and feelings can include a sense of shame, anger, or the tendency to be critical of oneself. When we tell ourselves that we are “stupid” or “lazy” when we do not achieve our goals as easily or as quickly as we like, we are reinforcing a negative world view that impacts on our ability to change our lives for the better. People who lack compassion for themselves frequently also struggle to feel compassion for others, often with profound repercussions for their ability to form and maintain healthy relationships.

Understanding the Human Mind

An understanding of how the human mind evolved, and how it still functions today, is at the root of Compassion Focused Therapy. Our brains have three distinct, basic ways to regulate our emotions:

  • Threat or protection
  • Drive or resource-seeking
  • Soothing

By understanding the role of each of these functions, which evolved over time to help us to survive an often very hostile environment, and how each interacts with the others, we acquire a more detailed understanding of how and why we react to stressors in the environment the way we do. For example, because we evolved in a risky environment, our brains are highly attuned to anything perceived as “risky” in our contemporary setting. This can sometimes result in us focusing excessively on encounters or events experienced as negative or upsetting. Your therapist can work with you to help you to understand how these systems impact on your behaviour, and how you can use a range of techniques to modulate your response to the things you see and experience.

How Does Compassion Focused Therapy Work?

Your therapist will use special training techniques and exercises, as well as mindfulness techniques, that will help you to develop the skills you need to feel compassion, such as the ability to tolerate distress and experience sympathy and sensitivity towards yourself and others. Over time, you will become enabled to step away from judgement and condemnation and to embrace more useful attitudes. By learning how to focus more on our positive experiences, we can learn how to see and appreciate compassion in the world around us. Steadily, we can learn how to recognise positivity more, giving us a brighter outlook as we face the challenges of everyday life.

Who is Compassion Focused Therapy For?

While Compassion Focused Therapy has a wide range of applications, it is especially useful for people who tend to be very self-critical and to experience feelings of shame and anger. These people often struggle to feel and demonstrate compassion to either themselves or others, frequently because of a personal history of being neglected, bullied, or not experiencing a lot of affection in their family of origin. By learning how their minds work and the origins of their negative feelings, they can learn about compassion, and start to experience feelings of compassion towards others, and towards themselves.

Get in Touch to Discuss Compassion Focused Therapy

If you would like to talk to someone about Compassion Focused Therapy, please get in touch with us at the Private Therapy Clinic by telephone at: 03331 222 370

THERAPISTS WHO OFFER CFT AT PRIVATE THERAPY CLINIC

  • 21 Aug 2019

    The 5 Things Most People Don’t Understand About Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD)

    Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is often mistaken by those who observe the condition in another as rudeness and even narcissism. And while it’s true that there is some cross over between both narcissistic individuals and those with BPD, the two are entirely separate conditions with their own.....

  • 19 Aug 2019

    7 Clear-Cut Signs Your Relationships Are Rooted in Co-Dependency

    Co-dependency is an emotional and behavioural condition that is often learned and passed down from one generation to the next. It's a dynamic that can take root in any form of relationship, from the romantic to companionships and friendships as well as being observed in caregiving situations......

  • 14 Aug 2019

    The 6 Defining Character Traits of Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) is a mental condition that is characterised by an obsession with one or more perceived flaws of one's physical appearance. It has recently been classified within the DSM-5 obsessive-compulsive and related disorders category. However, while it does share many common tra.....

  • 11 Aug 2019

    How to Recognise If You Have Relationship OCD

    Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a relatively common mental health issue in the UK, with around 1.2% of the population experiencing some form of it. People often tend to characterise the condition in finite terms, with the classic example of ritualistic behaviours used as the quintessential ca.....

  • 05 Aug 2019

    How do I Know When I Need to See A Psychiatrist?

    Medical dramas on TV often like to portray Psychiatrists as the first port of call if you're feeling down, or experiencing emotional difficulties. And although there is much good that can come from seeing a Psychiatrist, it isn't always the best avenue to explore. There are many types of mental heal.....

ALL ARTICLES