Obsessive-compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a relatively common disorder in which the sufferer struggles with unwelcome thoughts, anxiety, obsessive worries or concerns and, often, repetitive behaviours that are supposed to reduce the anxiety or compulsion.

One person might be obsessed with the idea that there are dangerous bacteria everywhere to the point whereby his obsession impacts seriously on his ability to live normally, while someone else might struggle with unwanted sexual desires or fantasies that she knows are inappropriate, and does not want to acknowledge.

The repetitive behaviours that develop as a result of these unwelcome thoughts might be obsessive hand-washing, endlessly checking to make sure that something has been done, an unhealthy degree of religiosity, and so forth. The problem lies in the fact that while these repetitive behaviours might keep the unwanted anxiety at bay, they can become a hindrance to living positively in their own right, while also doing nothing to tackle the root problem. People with OCD often have a very negative self-image, and worry that if they do not engage in their obsessive behaviours, they might act out on their unwelcome thoughts and impulses.

OCD is often associated with a range of other disorders too, such as Asperger’s, social anxiety, ADHD and more. Sufferers can also be tempted to “self-medicate” with alcohol and illegal or prescription drugs.

Treatment for OCD

OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder) can be treated in a range of ways, and treatment is important, as the condition is likely to get worse with no intervention, but usually responds very well to effective intervention.

As with many psychological disorders, medication (often selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIS, or antidepressants) can provide a degree of relief, but to really get to grips with the problem, it is also important to engage with other types of therapy, such as cognitive behavioural therapy, which focuses on highlighting the unhelpful Obsessive-compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a relatively common disorder in which the sufferer struggles with unwelcome thoughts, anxiety, obsessive worries or concerns and, often, repetitive behaviours that are supposed to reduce the anxiety or compulsion.

One person might be obsessed with the idea that there are dangerous bacteria everywhere to the point whereby his obsession impacts seriously on his ability to live normally, while someone else might struggle with unwanted sexual desires or fantasies that she knows are inappropriate, and does not want to acknowledge.

The repetitive behaviours that develop as a result of these unwelcome thoughts might be obsessive hand-washing, endlessly checking to make sure that something has been done, an unhealthy degree of religiosity, and so forth. The problem lies in the fact that while these repetitive behaviours might keep the unwanted anxiety at bay, they can become a hindrance to living positively in their own right, while also doing nothing to tackle the root problem. People with OCD often have a very negative self-image, and worry that if they do not engage in their obsessive behaviours, they might act out on their unwelcome thoughts and impulses.

OCD is often associated with a range of other disorders too, such as Asperger’s, social anxiety, ADHD and more. Sufferers can also be tempted to “self-medicate” with alcohol and illegal or prescription drugs.

Treatment for OCD

OCD can be treated in a range of ways, and treatment is important, as the condition is likely to get worse with no intervention, but usually responds very well to effective intervention.

As with many psychological disorders, medication (often selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIS, or antidepressants) can provide a degree of relief, but to really get to grips with the problem, it is also important to engage with other types of therapy, such as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), which focuses on highlighting the unhelpful emotions that lie behind the obsessive behaviours, and finding a way to manage them more effectively.

If you would like to talk to someone about OCD, please get in touch with us at the Private Therapy Clinic, we are based in London and Dubai. You can check our therapists availability by clicking the book online button here:

Book Online >>

 

  • Skype and FaceTime sessions are now seen as being as effective as Face to Face treatment. £20 off all video call sessions (Skype or FaceTime) per session, when you book online below.

    Special offer: Reduced rate £20 off Skype/Facetime per session BOOK ONLINE NOW
  • 6 sessions with a Psychotherapist: £600 instead of £720. 6 sessions with a Psychologist: £750 instead of £900

    Special offer: 6 sessions for the price of 5 when you book and pay for a block of sessions upfront. BOOK ONLINE NOW
  • Affordable therapy service

    If our premium therapy service isn't affordable for you, we also offer sessions with less senior practitioners. Fee from £40 per session. To check availability and book online below. BOOK ONLINE NOW

4.74 Average

133 Reviews

"Very helpful team, quick to respond and knowledgeable."

"We recently had the pleasure of enlisting Dr Becky Spelman as a spokesperson for a media campaign that got traction across a series of broadcast channels. Dr Spelman was incredibly easy to work with throughout the entire process - from initial briefs, content approvals, prompt responses, and then key message delivery during the secured interviews. Always the professional, I wouldn't hesitate to recommend or use her for similar campaign and spokesperson work in the future."

"Very kind and welcoming. Really appreciate their help."

"Very good first session, it was nice to find someone who put me at my ease and valued my opinions and experiences."

"I have been very impressed with the Private Therapy clinic. An assessment of my daughter for ADHD was made efficiently and caringly. I was even moved to start talking with a psychologist myself for the first time in many years - it's proving very interesting and yielding results already."