Dr. Jodie Waterhouse

Dr. Jodie Waterhouse

Clinical Psychologist & couples therapist.

Qualifications :

DClinPsy. (Doctorate in Clinical Psychology), PG.Diploma (Cognitive behavioural interventions), BSc. Psychology (Hons)

Accreditation :Health & Care Professions Council – Registered Psychologist (HCPC)
British Psychological Society – Chartered Psychologist

Clinics at :Bank., video call (Skype facetime) & phone consultations.

Fees :£150 per session £160 for couples therapy £170 for families and insurance

Health Insurance Registered with :AVIVA Cigna Vitality Health Bupa International WPA Exeter Family Axa PPP Allianz Simply Health

Dr Jodie Waterhouse has over 10 years’ experience working in mental health within the NHS and charity sectors. Specialising in adult mental health, Jodie has a particular interest in work with psychosis and bipolar affective disorder and also in the links between early and later life trauma and emotional wellbeing.  Within the NHS, Jodie has worked in a number of settings across the UK. This has allowed her to develop her skills working with anxiety disorders and depression, trauma, personality disorders and relationships difficulties across the life-span. She has also worked in forensic mental health settings for both adults and young people.

While predominantly using a cognitive-behavioural approach, Jodie integrates a number of models into her work including systems thinking and psychodynamic theory. Jodie works with clients individually, with couples and families and has experiences of running therapeutic groups. Jodie tries to consider the social context around her clients when working therapeutically as she believes that this can hugely impact upon a person’s mental health.

Jodie provides strategies to help her clients to better manage their emotions, improve their relationships and cope with the day to day stresses that life brings. She believes in making space for experiences non-judgementally using acceptance, compassion and mindfulness. For this reason, CBT influenced approaches including Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT) and Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) are important to her therapeutic style and approach.

Jodie appreciates how difficult the process of therapy can be and how exposed one can feel when first entering into a therapeutic relationship. Therefore she spends time getting to know her clients so that together they can develop a relationship that is collaborative, non-judgemental and allows the client to use the therapy effectively, at their own pace.

Jodie works in accordance with professional practice guidelines (BPS &HCPC) and keeps up to date with advances in therapy through attendance at regular professional training events. Jodie is a reflective, warm and thoughtful clinician who treats each of her clients as individuals requiring a tailored approach to help meet their needs and future goals.

How can I book an appointment with Dr Jodie Waterhouse?

To check Jodie’s availability and book an appointment with her online click here:

Bank availability 

Skype availability

Reviews

  • Anon

    My sessions here have helped loads. I suffer from bad anxiety but knowing I have an appointment with the clinic really settles me and allows me get on with my day

  • Anon

    Jodie helped me to change the way I think about things- instead of seeing things negatively I see them more positively. She helped me to think about my relationships and how I blame myself all the time when things go wrong. I am now kinder to myself. Jodie helped my see things from a different perspective and helped me to change the way I see myself.

Previous work

Television, Radio, Video & Articles


27 Oct 2016

Theory of mind, schizotypy, and persecutory ideation in young adults

Previous studies of the relation between theory of mind (ToM) and schizotypy have suggested that ToM deficits may be associated with positive signs (e.g., hallucination- and delusion-like experiences). Good theoretical reasons exist to suggest that this relation may be largely due to ToMdeficits being predominantly associated with the occurrence of persecutory delusion-like beliefs. This study set out to test this hypothesis and address limitations of previous research.....